Hurricane Irene’s Aftermath

I am so grateful that Hurricane Irene was a tropical storm by the time she blew through Western Massachusetts, but enough rain fell on already saturated ground that we’ve seen some of the worst flooding in over half a century in this area and in many areas of Southern Vermont where one of my sisters lives.

I am lucky enough to be on higher ground, and we didn’t lose power, but many millions did lose power, as well as having to deal with floods and downed trees.

Here’s some photos of the Eunice Williams’ Covered Bridge – where I had jumped from just a few weekends ago – and now it’s near collapse from the Green River flooding yesterday.

Before the flood:

Eunice Williams Covered Bridge, pre-flood

During the flood:

Flooded Green River at Eunice Williams Covered Bridge
Another angle Eunice Williams Covered Bridge flood
Walkway side, Eunice Williams Covered Bridge during flood
Closer view of Eunice Williams Covered Bridge walkway during flood

In this shot, all the water flow to the right in front of the now broken concrete overflow section had been solid ground and trees the day before yesterday.

Reservoir Area now flooded over August 28, 2011

Here is some video footage I took of the flooded Green River:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlaOlZIGlhs

The Deerfield River (of which the Green River is a main tributary) was also at least ten feet above its banks, flooding from Vermont through Massachusetts, where it exits into the Connecticut River, which was swollen as well but not at its flood stage as of this morning.

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© seekingsearchingmeaning (aka Hermionejh) and Life On Earth’s Blog, 2010 – infinity.

 

Calm Before The Storm

It’s supposed to be a sunny, hot, day today and I hope to get to the beach for a last hurrah.  Sunday we’ll have a most unwelcome guest in Hurricane Irene and I am hoping that the hype and anticipation are worse than the event.  I need to secure what I can and make sure we have enough batteries and water in case power is knocked out for a few days, but outside of that, there is nothing we can do but wait.

I’m grateful to live in a time when storms can be predicted fairly well in advance, but only the aftermath will tell the truth. I’m remembering Hurricane Andrew‘s devastation on Homestead, Florida in 1992, and while Irene is as large a mass, I don’t think the winds are as strong.  Hurricane Katrina, was so incredibly devastating, but more because of weak levees and the criminal action (or non-action) in the aftermath.  Flooding is the direst warning at this point, so we’ll see what happens.

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© seekingsearchingmeaning (aka Hermionejh) and Life On Earth’s Blog, 2010 – infinity.